Breaking News
Home » Hydrogen Fueling Stations » Japan to Build 100 Hydrogen Fueling Stations by 2015

Japan to Build 100 Hydrogen Fueling Stations by 2015

Japan’s earthquake and tsunami on March 11, 2011 and subsequent Fukushima Daiichi nuclear disaster have given the leaders of that country a lot to think about in regard to the safe use of energy going forward.

And because of the desire to use safe, renewable green energy and to use it in cars, the Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry (METI) is asking to have money in their upcoming budget to build 100 hydrogen fueling stations by the year 2015.

According to Mainichi, “Since the government is trying to reduce Japan’s reliance on nuclear power following the outbreak of the Fukushima nuclear crisis, it is feared that carbon dioxide emissions will sharply increase as renewable energy is highly unlikely to make up for the loss of atomic power.

“In order to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, METI hopes to promote the quick adoption of fuel-cell cars …

“… METI intends to ensure that about 100 hydrogen filling stations will be built in the Tokyo metropolitan area, Kansai, Chubu and Kyushu by 2015 – when fuel-cell vehicles become commercially available.”

METI is asking for around $38 million USD for the project and they will be working with several research entities to come up with a cheap supply of hydrogen for the fueling stations.

About Hydro Kevin Kantola

Hydro Kevin Kantola
I'm a hydrogen car blogger, editor and publisher interested in documenting the history and the progression of hydrogen cars, vehicles and infrastructure worldwide.

Check Also

Japan Will Miss Target of 100 H2 Fueling Stations by 2016 – So What?

According to Reuters news organization, Japan will most likely miss its target of building 100 …

One comment

  1. “METI is asking for around $38 million USD for the project and they will be working with several research entities to come up with a cheap supply of hydrogen for the fueling stations.”

    This seems like a big question for Japan.

    Mass quantities of cheap hydrogen come from 1) coal, 2) natural gas or 3) nuclear.

    Unless Japan begins tapping methane hydrates, or gets serious about nukes again, this isnt going to be easy. Japan already imports natural gas and coal.

Leave a Reply